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CRPANews Alert: CRPA Files Important Amicus Brief in Lawsuit

October 12, 2018

CRPA Files Important Amicus Brief in Lawsuit Challenging Fish and Game Commission’s Illegal Decision to Classify Gray Wolf as Endangered Species

California generally requires a science-based approach before listing any species as endangered and protected. But the California Fish and Game Commission chose to ignore this requirement when, under pressure by certain animal rights groups, it arbitrarily classified the gray wolf as an endangered species in 2014. In fact, the Commission ignored the research and recommendation of its own department, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, that such a listing would not be warranted.

Fearing the potential danger this decision poses to livestock and domesticated animals, as well as the natural balance of other wild species, the California Cattlemen’s Association and California Farm Bureau Federation filed suit. And this week, despite fervent opposition by the Commission, the court granted CRPA leave to file an important amicus brief in support of the plaintiffs.

CRPA’s brief highlights how the Commission arbitrarily placed the gray wolf on the endangered species list, and by doing so deviated from state law and nationally recognized standards for wildlife preservation. What’s more, the decision to list the gray wolf was based in part on the presence of a single wolf from a neighboring state, illustrating how the Commission exceeded its authority to classify native species as endangered.

One of CRPA’s primary missions is to preserve and protect hunting opportunities in California. As CRPA’s amicus brief highlights, listing gray wolves as endangered will likely lead to overpopulation of predators that prey on California’s ungulate populations, thereby upsetting the delicate balance of wildlife preservation and hunting opportunities in general. CRPA’s brief discusses the experiences of neighboring states in arguing that California would be unable to sustain its deer population should wolves fully repopulate the state and cause levels of predation witnessed elsewhere. CRPA is pleased that the court recognized that it could provide a unique perspective on this and other important issues in the case and chose to allow CRPA to participate as amicus.

To stay up-to-date on this and other important hunting related issues, be sure to subscribe to NRA and CRPA email alerts. And be sure to visit the NRA-ILA California dedicated webpage at www.StandAndFightCalifornia.com and the CRPA webpage at www.CRPA.org.

CRPA Files Important Amicus Brief in Lawsuit Challenging Fish and Game Commission’s Illegal Decision to Classify Gray Wolf as Endangered Species

California generally requires a science-based approach before listing any species as endangered and protected. But the California Fish and Game Commission chose to ignore this requirement when, under pressure by certain animal rights groups, it arbitrarily classified the gray wolf as an endangered species in 2014. In fact, the Commission ignored the research and recommendation of its own department, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, that such a listing would not be warranted.

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