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CA DOJ “Assault Weapon” Registration

June 27, 2018

Today, CRPA attorneys filed a joint stipulation with the California Department of Justice (“CA DOJ”) to file an amended complaint dismissing a portion of the claims raised in the Rupp v. Becerra lawsuit. The stipulation is a result of CA DOJ clarifying their position regarding registrations for “assault weapons” lacking the required “date and source” information.

Pursuant to California law, anyone wishing to register a firearm now classified as an “assault weapon” under Senate Bill No. 880 (“SB 880”) and Assembly Bill No. 1135 (“AB 1135”) must provide certain information on their registration application. In addition to a description that identifies the firearm uniquely (such as the serial number, make, model, and caliber of the firearm), applicants must also provide information regarding the date the firearm was acquired and the name and address of the individual or business from whom it was acquired.

But many gun owners who wish to register their firearms do not have this required information—and for good reason. California law never required gun owners to keep detailed records of when and where they acquired their firearms.

One of the plaintiffs in the Rupp lawsuit suffered from this exact issue. Attempting to resolve the problem, the plaintiff contacted CA DOJ for assistance. CA DOJ responded by providing clarifying instructions to the plaintiff and ultimately approved his registration application which contained his “best recollection” of the date and source information.

While this issue was resolved for the plaintiff in Rupp, gun owners attempting to register a firearm should be aware that this solution may not work for everyone. If you find yourself in a similar situation and you have determined that you want to register your firearm, you should contact the California Department of Justice, Bureau of Firearms, for instructions on how to complete your application. And remember—gun owners have until midnight on June 30th to register their firearms as “assault weapons.”

There are also other potential pitfalls when registering a firearm as an “assault weapon.” To help you avoid those issues, make sure to review NRA and CRPA’s webinars regarding the registration process. And if you decide not to register, NRA and CRPA have produced additional webinars concerning potential alternatives such as making the firearm “California compliant” or “featureless.”

To stay informed on the Rupp case and other important issues, including any updates regarding the registration of “assault weapons,” make sure you are subscribed to NRA and CRPA email alerts.

Today, CRPA attorneys filed a joint stipulation with the California Department of Justice (“CA DOJ”) to file an amended complaint dismissing a portion of the claims raised in the Rupp v. Becerra lawsuit. The stipulation is a result of CA DOJ clarifying their position regarding registrations for “assault weapons” lacking the required “date and source” information.

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